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  • jane@northside

Why should I train to be a Clinical Supervisor?

Updated: Oct 17

If you are an experienced therapist or counsellor and looking for the next step in your career - why not train to be a clinical supervisor?


I've been talking to the Diploma in Supervision course trainers to find out what made them want to take the step to Supervision. What they have to say shows how everyone's approach and journey is individual. They are both inspiring.

Following this are some of the more common reasons for practitioners choosing the supervision route.


 

Bev Gibbons

"I had had a range of experiences in supervision some crushing and painful, some affirming and inspiring, some challenging and requiring of courage, often great fun."
Bev Gibbons


As a therapist I had had a range of experiences in supervision some crushing and painful, some affirming and inspiring, some challenging and requiring of courage, often great fun. In all experiences I grew when there was honesty, authenticity and a willingness in my supervisor to be non-defensive and curious, a fellow traveler who welcomed all of me, and could be both robust and humble. When I reached the point where I felt able to hold this place in myself, then I stepped into the supervisor role.





 

Ronen Stilman

Ronen Stilman
"I have always been fascinated by the meta perspective and its affect on how we identify and relate."

As an immigrant I have always been fascinated by the meta perspective and its affect on how we identify and relate. As a supervisor, I wanted to get insight to another layer of meta perspective, and hoped that through these conversations my frame would be significantly challenged and expanded, as well as the ripple affect of my work would expand beyond my practice onto the practice of others.


 

Other reasons why people choose to become supervisors


As Bev and Ronen show, there are any number of reasons why someone might choose to train to become a clinical supervisor. Some of the more common reasons are:


To improve their own clinical skills

When supervising others, supervisors often find that they become better clinicians themselves. This is because they are forced to think critically about the work of their supervisees, and to consider how best to support and guide them. This reflection then impacts on their own clinical work.


The next step in professional development

Many practitioners and mental health professionals choose the supervision route because they see it as the next step in their professional development. For example, within transactional analysis, supervision and training development are two parts of the PTSTA (Provisional Teaching and Supervising Transactional Analyst) qualification. Applicants have to demonstrate their philosophy and supervision skills as part of the exam.


To help others

Supervisors play a vital role in supporting other professionals as they develop their skills and build their professional work. By providing feedback, guidance, and support, supervisors can help their supervisees become more effective therapists, which can in turn lead to better outcomes for clients.


Developing the field and ethical curiosity

Clinical supervisors have the opportunity to shape the next generation of mental health professionals. By sharing their expertise and experience with their supervisees, they can help to advance the field. An key element of this work is in the area of professional ethics. Supervisors have significant ethical responsibility. As such, a curiosity about ethical issues and the ability to look at an issue from multiple view points is a good skill to develop. Moving the field forward will ultimately improve the quality of mental health care both for individual clients and in general terms.


In conclusion, training to become a supervisor can be a rewarding and fulfilling career path for those interested. Given the level of responsibility, we do recommend undertaking supervision training as the first stage.


 

Main image for Diploma in clinical supervision

A dynamic supervision course for practitioners looking to develop, deepen and broaden their supervision practice. With places on the course limited to a small group, our two trainers co-training together, ensure attendees get the very best theoretical and experiential training in supervision.

The Diploma in Supervision is a 10 day programme aligned with BACP and UKCP standards for supervision training. With a tried and tested blend of academic theory and practical experience, the course will give you the skills and knowledge you need to become a clinical supervisor.

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